Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.), one of the two GOP lawmakers rejected by Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probeHouse Democrats grow frustrated as they feel ignored by SenateYellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk ‘irreparable harm’MORE (D-Calif.) from serving on the Jan. 6 committee, accused the Speaker on Sunday of being responsible for the “breakdown of security” that day that led to a mob storming the Capitol. 

“Due to the rules of the United States Capitol, the power structure of the Capitol, Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the House, has more control and authority and responsibility over the leadership of the Capitol Police than anyone else in the United States Capitol,” Banks said during an appearance on “Fox News Sunday.”

“So she doesn’t want us to ask these questions because at the end of the day, she is ultimately responsible for the breakdown of security at the capitol that happened on January 6,” he said.

A mob of former President Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governorArkansas governor says it’s ‘disappointing’ vaccinations have become ‘political’Watch live: Trump attends rally in PhoenixMORE’s supporters attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6 to stop the counting of the Electoral College. They did so after weeks in which Trump said the election had been stolen from him, a baseless claim that the former president has continued to make in the months since that attack.

Trump was impeached for inciting the mob, though the Senate did not convict him. There were notably GOP votes in the House to impeach him, and to convict him in the Senate.

Five people died in connection to the violence on Jan. 6. 

Pelosi blocked Banks and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanSunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probeFreedom Caucus presses McCarthy to force vote to oust PelosiMaryland’s GOP governor slams ‘whitewashing’ of Jan. 6 riotMORE (R-Ohio) from serving on the select committee after House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthySunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probeDemocrats question GOP shift on vaccinesHas Trump beaten the system?MORE (R-Calif.) picked them.

Banks said he was rejected because Pelosi “doesn’t want to talk about what happened at the capitol that day,” and is “only interested in a narrative.”

Pelosi said last week that she rejected Banks and Jordan due to concerns over how their appointment would affect the “integrity of the investigation.” She accepted the three remaining appointees from McCarthy, though the GOP leader withdrew all his nominees in protest of Pelosi’s decision on Banks and Jordan.

Banks, a staunch ally of Trump, had questioned the “legality” of the 2020 election and was a supporter of the Texas lawsuit that sought to overturn the election results in other states where President BidenJoe BidenTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governorRepublicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains changeBiden on hecklers: ‘This is not a Trump rally. Let ’em holler’MORE won.

Pelosi on Sunday said she planned on appointing Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKey Biden ally OK with dropping transit from infrastructure packageThe Hill’s Morning Report – Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panelDemocrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcementsMORE (R-Ill.), a vocal GOP critic of Trump, to the Jan. 6 select committee. She had already named Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Goldman Sachs – Tokyo Olympics kick off with 2020-style opening ceremonyThe Hill’s Morning Report – Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panelDemocrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcementsMORE (R-Wy.) to the panel.

Both backed Trump’s impeachment.

“It’s clear that Pelosi only once members on this committee who will stick to her talking points and stick to her narrative,” Banks said of Kinzinger’s possible nomination. “That’s why she’s picked the group that she’s already picked and anyone that she asked to be on this committee from this point moving forward will be stuck to her, her narrative, to her point-of-view.”